When You Wish Upon a Star…

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They like me. They really, really like me.

Now I know how Sally Field felt.

Film and television producer Jerry Bruckheimer – one of Hollywood's best at getting the job done – has optioned my novel, Secret Lives of Husbands and Wives, and sold it to ABC Television as a dramatic series.

You can read about it here…

People, this so RARELY happens. Yes, there have been some hit-it-out-of-the park novel-to-TV-series adaptations. Charlaine Harris's True Blood is a perfect example.

But they are few, and far between.

So, yes, I know: I could not be more blessed.

Wow. ABC! I remember Sunday evenings, sitting in front of our television set waiting anxiously for Tinkerbell to sprinkle me with some of that Disney magic.

 Better late than never.

And I could not have asked for a better Prince Charming to take me to my very first Hollywood ball.

Everything I've been told about Mr. Bruckheimer makes me happy that he's whisked me out onto the the dance floor. Through his production companies, he has built a great team of executive producers. He looks for strong, hardworking writers, and he builds stellar casts from actors who work hard to breathe life into their characters.

Now my characters — Lyssa, Harry, Ted, DeeDee, and their motely crew of neurotic neighbors — will be brought to life.

And if our show is lucky enough to catch the zeitgeist left in the final season stardust trail of ABC's very popular hit series Desperate Housewivesmy characters will have a chance to live long and prosper.

To all the readers who loved Lyssa and her story, I thank you for writing me to let me know, and telling me how much she (and I) touched your lives.

To all the book reviewers who sang the praises of Secret Lives of Husbands and Wives, I love you, too, and will always appreciate the role you played in encouraging readers to buy my book.

That said I'll let you know what I know, when I know it: who will star, when the show premiers, how well it does– hey, we can even watch together! You'll find me Tweeting and Facebooking every week a new show runs, so I hope you'll join me.

And I'll certainly be running a VERY SPECIAL CONTEST through the night of its premiere. More on that later….

In fact, if after doing so you answer this question correctly, I'll include your winning entry in a contest for one of 5 autographed copies of my latest novel The Baby Planner

Until then, I hope you'll  pick up a copy of Secret Lives of Husbands and Wives. Start by reading an excerpt here and then write and tell me:

What is the name of Harry's son?

Email your answer to: MailFromJosie@gmail.com
no later than 11:59 pm PDT, Saturday December 10, 2011.

 

Thanks for helping me reach my star.

The clock hasn't struck twelve yet, so let's all get in one more dance,

 

— Josie

 

Simon & Schuster/Downtown Press

(ISBN: 9781439173176)

In bookstores now!

"Hollywood's got nothing on the cast of characters living in the bedroom community of Paradise Heights, who have the secrets, sex, money and scandal of an OK! Magazine cover story. Josie Brown is a skilled observer whose clever dialogue and feisty style make for truly entertaining reading." 

Jackie Collins, bestselling author of Hollywood Wives

 


 

Housewife Couture: Dior’s Fantasy Was Not the Reality

DiorNewHousewife I love looking at my mother's photos of her in the 1950s, when she was a newlywed, albeit pre-children. In the one I'm looking at now, her hair is pulled back in an elegant chignon. At her neck is the requisite  strand of pearls. She wears fitted below-the-knee dress.

When at play, photos show her in Capri pants and crisp sleeveless blouses.

She had the figure to do it all justice.

She was a Dior housewife.

When the war ended, Rosie the Riveter gave her factory gig back to the man in her life so that he could bring him the bacon, and she could fry it up — obviously not in the couture concoction seen here.

That's okay. Labeled "The New Look" by the media, Christian Dior was selling a wonderful dream that went hand-in-glove with the white picket fence every woman supposedly craved: fitted jacket, flared skirt, chapeau perched at an appealing angle…

And the eyes of every man in sight mesmerized by the vision of you.

DiorNewLook2 It helped that the end of war meant freedom for fabrics, too, to be used in clothes that made women—well, more womanly. Out with the overalls, in with crepe or chiffon cocktail dresses, shirtwaist dresses, and the hostess apron.

Martinis and hors d'oeuvres, anyone?

Now, five decades later, I — and the rest of my restless generation — live for comfort, not luxury. This means yoga pants and hoodies. For an evening out, I up the ante to jeans, a nice top, and slouchy boots.

Obviously, I (or my wardrobe) lack my mother's elegance.

Do I blame myself, or the fashion gods?

Neither. To paraphrase Trollope, it's the way we live now.

I'll have what she's having…and make mine a double,

—Josie




SecretLives400  Josie' s Next Book: Secret Lives of Husbands and Wives

Simon & Schuster/Downtown Press

(ISBN: 9781439173176)

Look for it in bookstores June 1, 2010

From Amazon

From Barnes & Noble

From Bigger Books

From Books a Million

From Borders

From Copperfield's

From Your Local Independent Bookstore

From Powell's

Art from the Heart: Kelly Reemtsen’s AFFLICTED

AfflictedI saw this wonderful oil-on-board painting on the cover of Marin magazine
(a guilty li'l pleasure of mine. I'm such a townie, ain't I?) and I just had to share. It's called “Afflicted,” and the artist is Kelly Reemtsen, who shows her work here in San Francisco's
Caldwell Snyder Gallery. (They have a second gallery in the wonderful wine country village of St. Helena.)This is just one painting in a series that, to me, epitomizes the calm desperation of women in the aspiring class: despite an outward sheen of elegance, inside they've come unraveled.

So cool that the viewer can never look the subject in the eye. Without faces, without eye contact, we can only read body language — and the items these women wield in order to vanquish the niggling little problems that are ruining their perfect lives.

But that's just my interpretation. I'd love to hear yours, too.

In fact, I've just made a momentous decision! Every Saturday I'll turn this blog turns into an Internet art gallery by uplinking similar works, by Ms. Reemtsen and other artists, whose works I feel tell a story similar to what I'll be telling you in my next novel, SECRET LIVES OF HUSBANDS AND WIVES.

A picture is worth 94,000 words,

—Josie

 Josie' s Next Book: Secret Lives of Husbands and Wives

Simon & Schuster/Downtown Press

(ISBN: 9781439173176)

Look for it in bookstores June 1, 2010

Pre-Order at any of the bookstore links in my sidebar…