Josie’s Latest Radio Recap of THE BACHELORETTE, on Chat With Women

Edandjillian Okay, yeah, I know: morning voice.  Ain't it sexy? That's what happens when you NEED A NEW ALARM CLOCK.

Click here to listen to me recapping THE BACHELORETTE, Jillian's, choices (6/30/09) with Seattle KKNW's very own Chat with Women morning show hosts, Pam  and Rochelle. Every Tuesday morning at 8am PT, I give some insights on why she may be sticking it out with the allegedly two-timin' Wes (even though she is SO OBVIOUSLY attracted to Kiptyn…I'm just sayin'.)

Of course, I'm able to sneak in a few mentions of my book (coming out September 2009) THE COMPLETE IDIOT'S GUIDE TO FINDING MR. RIGHT.


Now, go vote on SingleMindedWomen.com's Weekly Bachelorette Elimination Poll. You can win WONDERFUL prizes: $100 of Sephora make-up, a beautiful sterling silver necklace by Big Girl Workshops, and of course, a copy of mine book

Don't we all wish we had 30 (or even 4) guys to luv us,

—Josie

CIG-Finding-Mr.-Right
Complete Idiot's Guide to Finding Mr. Right – In Bookstores September 2009

Tome of the Mommy: Mr. Mom, Welcome to the (Parent)Hood!

Visit msnbc.com for Breaking News, World News, and News about the Economy

The reason for their sudden appearances on our neighborhood parks may not be so wonderful—the result of this recession's layoffs—but happy dads (yeah, I'll say it, even a few DILFs or two) are always welcomed to share a shady spot and shoot the breeze with us moms.

It's interesting to watch the interaction: first a wariness, then a tentative welcome. Soon, everyone's sharing goldfish, carrot sticks and juice boxes.

Wish someone would slip in a Thermos of mojitos. I'm just sayin'…

Guys, don't ever presume the mommy clique on the picnic bench is a club in which no boys are allowed. In fact, the password that gets you in every time (along with a choice spot on the bench) is "Wow, your kid is so well-behaved…"

That's music to any mother's ears.

In The DILF –my book which comes out next summer –one man cracks the code, only to discover he's opened a Pandora's box filled with the misperceptions, fantasies and desires his female neighbors have about him and his now-disintegrated marriage. I'll have an excerpt up soon.

Seems that the timing couldn't be better for my book. As NBC's TODAY SHOW points out in the video piece above, there are enough dads out there now, that they're forming their own papa posses. (Wow! Did I just coin that phrase? Sure what the hey, I'll take credit for it…)

One very interesting comment is one dad's admission that sometimes the men talk about "our past lives before we had children."

Hmmmm. You mean, when the impulse to go out at night wasn't given a second thought ("Oh my god! Who can we get to sit with the baby?")

Or, you could sleep in and snuggle (or whatever) without be tapped on the shoulder by a toddler wanting to play?

Or when conversations revolved around work and sports and all things coupledom, as opposed to diaper-training and schools and all things parenthood?

Welcome to the club.
No, we really mean that. You came through initiation with flying colors.

Or, as one guy put it when the reporter asks if his Mr. Mom stint makes him a better dad: "It makes me a good-enough dad."

Reporter: "Hey, give yourself some credit!"

Dad, conceding: "It certainly makes me a better dad."

Your wife will agree.

 

—Josie

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Mr. Big as The DILF

504x_BAZAARMILLATWO As you know, I'm into DILFs in a big way these days (Blatant Self Promotion: My book, The DILF, hits bookstores Summer 2010). Obviously I've caught the zeitgeist (or, I guess, the economy has caught up with my plottin' and schemin'), because DILFs seem to be the new black.

Case in point: BAZAAR lives up to its name by downsizing SEX AND THE CITY's Mr. Big (Chris Noth) into a stay-at-home dad. He makes a cute DILF, doesn't he?

And needless to say, Milla Jovovich makes a stunning alpha wife. That straight fuchsia skirt is fetching, isn't it? Reminds me of my fave designer jacket of that same color, a wardrobe staple (worn with either a solid black or white skirt) when life required that I suit up.

Dems weren't the daze,

—Josie


PS: Thanks, Poppy, for the link…

Tome of the Mommy, #1: It’s official. SECRET LIVES OF HUSBANDS AND WIVES will be a book.

Kissing It's being published by Simon & Schuster. I'm thrilled, as you can imagine. Let's start with the fact that I'm enchanted with my editor, Megan McKeever. The excitement she and her team have for this project is an author's dream.

And just think: this time next year, it will be on a bookstore shelf near you.

What's the story? It is a chronicle of the bitter divorce of a "perfect
couple," and its impact on the gated community in which they live, is
seen through the eyes of a neighbor–Lyssa, a stay-at-home mom–who
doesn't realize the parallels between their marriage and her own. In
the process, she befriends the husband, Harry, a former Master of the
Universe turned stay-at-home dad–even as the neighborhood's mean mommies
vying to make him the next notch on their bedposts turn on her.

Just another fun day in suburbia, right?

6a00d83452b0d869e201156fbf8b42970c-800wi You know, writing a book is a lot like birthing a baby. The moment you
realize it's actually going to happen, you fall into a euphoric trance.

Sheer bliss.

And nothing can take that away from you…

Except the worry that perhaps something bad will befall it while it's
incubating. For an author, that can be anything from the "I'm not
worthy!" to "Will it find an audience?" to "What do I have to say
that is compelling enough to hold someone's attention for 300+ pages?" 

When this happens, those deep breathing exercises we learn in Lamaze classes certainly come in handy.

Well, I'm happy to report that I'm feeling no qualms whatsoever. (Liar, Liar, pants on fire..)

No,
seriously, I mean that. I've been through the birthing experience, four
times: two that were the human kind (Austin and Anna), and another two
that were the novel kind (and Impossibly Tongue-Tied and True Hollywood Lies).

During that first trimester, reality sets in. There is
so much preparation before the blessed event: outlining a compelling
plot; creating characters that are real–to you, and hopefully future
readers; making sure the dialogue coming out of their mouths is
something someone would actually say–and that others would respond to.

Is it any wonder you feel nauseous?

By the middle trimester, you're in your groove: pages are flowing, you're heavy with chapter, edits are coming back, but nothing that you feel throws the plot baby out with the bath water. (Some analogy, huh?) In fact, you fall into a complacent routine where everything seems hunky-dory…

But by it's delivery date – in The DILF's case, June 2010 – you are more than ready to share you bundle of joy with the rest of the world.

Will this book be The Second Coming? I would never presume as much. (Besides, in the book universe, Harry Potter has already claimed that title.) Wise parents know that the most they can hope for their offspring is a long and fruitful life.

And of course, you envision a success future. (Those of us who had reserved our children's places in their preschools even before they were born know what I mean).

So that my new baby lives a long and healthy life, I'm going to go on the theory that it takes a village to birth a book. I'll include you on how it's going: all the birthing pains, all those little kicks of joy, all the hopes and schemes and dreams I have for it, to make it a book you'll want to read.

Along the way, I'll ask your opinion, let you in on some secrets (plot-wise, and about the writer's process), and invite you to the celebration of this blessed birth. And great news! When time comes for my new baby's shower, the gifts will be for you

So stay tuned!

—Josie

www.josiebrown.com