The Week California was on fire.

 

Last week was interesting, to say the least.

When my husband, Martin, woke up before daybreak.

Then he looked at the clock.

Then he woke me up.

Then I got depressed.

The numerous fires occurring right now in Northern California was very visible even seventy-plus miles south: here in San Francisco.

But then I remembered, “People all over my state are burned out of their homes and their towns. They may have lost a friend, a family member, or a pet. I'm not a firefighter who is battling weeks of roaring flames, non-stop. I am lucky.

We have to count their blessing when they come.

A week later, the sky is finally blue again. Still, there are big fires everywhere.

This hasn't been a great year. Still, some good has come from it.

When it's come to my writing, I've kept my head down. Because of it, you'll see Donna Stone Craig go through many trials and tribulations, which, admittedly, is a reflection on our collective year, if not for the same reasons.

And to get out of my head—that is, my character's machinations—I've started my online print bookstore. The details are below. And guess what? You can buy any two books and get another book as a gift from me.

I've been producing audiobooks of my novels. You'll learn more of that by Thanksgiving: just around the time I'll be releasing Assassination Vacation Planner, the 20th novel in the Housewife Assassin series. There's a link below where you can pre-order it.

Talking to other authors also opens up my world. So that it is a part of yours, too, I hope you'll take the time to listen my interview with Robert Dugoni about his latest novel, The Last Agent. I know you'll enjoy our conversation about this fast-paced spy caper. And Robert is always so open about his process as an author. He's a blast to talk to.

The best thing about Fridays: the week is over, and we get to take a few days off. I hope I've given you some great insights, and a few good reads.

—Josie

Photo: The iconic Transamerica tower in a smoke-tinged sky.

Smile. Not just for our sakes, but for yours too.

Smile SidewalkSMILE.

It doesn't matter that you're wearing a mask and no one can see it.

And, yes, go ahead and say, “Hello.” Or, “How are you?” Maybe: “Have a nice day.”

Despite our anxieties, we can still communicate kind words and actions: say, a nod. Better yet, a wave.

I've noticed that, since COVID, I've avoided looking others in the eye. I no longer pet strangers' dogs, let alone ask the age of their pet, or complement their pet's pretty coat.

The only positive thing that's come out of it is that, while looking elsewhere, I see some things I may have missed: like the artist Fnnch's honey bears, which have popped up all over San Francisco. They masked in solidarity with the rest of us.

And when looking down, more street art catches my eye, like the lyrics to that great song from the musical, “Annie,” reminding us to smile.

Frankly, I'm glad to be chided out of my anxiety. I don't like the scaredy-cat I've become.

I don't like projecting my fears onto strangers.

It stops NOW.

If you've felt the same way, join me in regaining some of the humanity we're hiding under our masks.

To honor those who are genuinely superhuman—our first responders, the folks in the front lines of serving the sick, elderly, and the neediest among us; and those who keep essential businesses running so the rest of us can try to get through this as best we can— the very least we can do is to be human. Again.

—Josie

 

Hump Day Haiku: “The Bald Guy”

Baldmandating

I date a bald guy/

The great news: he's not a creep/

My friends say, "Clone him!"

— Josie