Woman gets her jollies on a San Francisco Cable Car. One hundred lovers and a $50K settlement later…

Judy-st.-louis

l love this article, from the archives of the San Francisco Chronicle. Brings to mind one of my favorite Judy Garland classics,  "The Trolley Song," from the musical, "Meet Me in St. Louis:"

Love this lyric: "I went to lose a jolly".

I'll just bet you did,

— Josie

"Cable Car Nymph"

Excerpted from

"San Francisco's Top 10 Sex Scandals"
Kevin Fagan, San Francisco Chronicle 
Published 4:00 am, Thursday, May 28, 2009

It was supposed to be a routine trip on the Hyde Street cable car in 1964, the 29-year-old woman said. But when the car lurched and she was heaved against a pole, the collision "somehow unleashed emotions hidden deep in the dark closet of her mind," The Chronicle reported – and thus was born "The cable car nymphomaniac" who took a trip on the "Cable Car Named Desire."

The woman sued Muni for $500,000 six years later, saying her injuries had triggered an insatiable sexual desire that drove her to take 100 lovers, leaving her perpetually unsatisfied. Reporters left her name out of news accounts, to protect her privacy, referring to her instead by her nickname, or as "the buxom blonde" from Michigan.

She was awarded $50,000 by a jury, whose members said they hoped she would use it for counseling.

(c) 2009 San Francisco Chronicle

 

 

With my high starched collar

And my high topped shoes

And my hair

Piled high upon my head

I went to lose a jolly

Hour on the Trolley

And lost my heart instead

 

With his light brown derby

And his bright green tie

He was quite

The handsomest of men

I started to yen

So I counted to ten

Then I counted to ten again

 

Clang, clang, clang went the trolley

Ding, ding, ding went the bell

Zing, zing, zing went my heartstrings

From the moment I saw him I fell

Chug, chug, chug went the motor

Bump, bump, bump went the brake

Thump, thump, thump went my heartstrings

When he smiled I could feel the car shake

He tipped his hat

And took a seat

He said he hoped he hadn't

Stepped upon my feet

He asked my name

I held my breath

I couldn't speak because

He scared me half to death

 

Buzz, buzz, buzz went the buzzer

Plop, plop, plop went the wheels

Stop, stop, stop went my heartstrings

As he started to go

Then I started to know

How it feels

When the universe reels

The day was bright

The air was sweet

The smell of honeysuckle

Charmed you off your feet

You tried to sing

But couldn't squeak

In fact, you loved him

So you couldn't even speak

 

Buzz, buzz, buzz went the buzzer

Plop, plop, plop went the wheels

Stop, stop, stop went my heartstrings

As he started to leave

I took hold of his sleeve

With my handAnd as if it were planned

He stay on with me

And it was grand just to stand

With his hand holding mine

Till the end of the line

 

Clang, clang, clang went the trolley

Zing, zing, zing went my heart

 

Songwriters: HUGH MARTIN/BLANE, RALPH

Published byLyrics © EMI Music Publishing

 

 

NaNoWriMo Tip #19: Scene needs a rewrite? Change the point-of-view.

Wicked-witch

Sometimes while working on your novel — perhaps several hours into your work day — it becomes obvious that a particular scene just isn't working out. You've changed the starting point and the dialogue, and that didn't help. You've even added a character or two, and noticed that the only effect it had was to slow the pace: not good.

Instead, try changing the point of view in which the scene unfolds.

For example, if you've been writing it through the eyes of your heroine, rewrite it so that it is now seen through the villian's eyes, or even those of a secondary character. 

By doing so, you allow the reader to also see the action from a different perspective — and that new point of view may make them more sympathetic to your heroine. 

Not only does this exercise shed new light on your heroine. It also adds dimension to the secondary character. We would not have felt so strongly about Dobby, the free-thinking house elf in the Harry Potter series, if we had not read a scene from his perspective.

In fact, the whole story takes on a new life when seen from a different character's point of view. In his novel Wicked, Gregory Maguire has built his reputation and success imagining L. Frank Baum's The Wonderful Wizard of Oz from the viewpoint of Elphaba, the name he bestowed on the before nameless Wicked Witch of the West.

Just imagine if some of the scenes in Adventures of Huckleberry Finn were played out in the mind's eye of his friend: the runaway slave, Jim.

A whole new take on a literary classic can be created if you open yourself up to the possibility of seeing it through different eyes.

(c) 2011 Josie Brown. All Rights Reserved

The photo above is a scene from the movie version of The Wizard of Oz, with Judy Garland and Margaret Hamilton.

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READ YESTERDAY'S TIP HERE…

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Question of the day: Have you changed the POV of a scene, with success? Share it, below, so we can celebrate it together. 

Happy National Novel Writing Month,

— Josie