Saturday Share: This captures beautifully why I love San Francisco Bay

After being away for a few weeks, it's great to be reminded of why I call the San Francisco Bay Area home. This video, by Simon Christen, does just that.

Thanks, Simon!

 

Yes, you can go home again,

–Josie


(ISBN: 9781439173176)

In bookstores June 1, 2010. Order it TODAY!

"Hollywood's got nothing on the cast of characters living in the bedroom community of Paradise Heights, who have the secrets, sex, money and scandal of an OK! Magazine cover story. Josie Brown is a skilled observer whose clever dialogue and feisty style make for truly entertaining reading." –Jackie Collins, Hollywood Wives

 

Judging a Book by Its Cover: Secret Lives of Husbands and Wives

PosterSee that messy desk?

Ooops! Let me start again…

See that colorful poster over the messy desk? The one of the eye-catching book cover?

That book cover is mine.

It belongs to the novel you'll soon see in bookstores–June 1, 2010, to be exact–all over the country.

It will also be inside Target, which makes me very proud, because I feel that the story–about a marriage disintegrating, and what others who are close to it project their own fears into it–would relate to many of us who shop there.

This cover was blown up to a size that is close to 2 feet by 3 feet. Since a book's cover is the first consideration for a book lover's impulse buy, unfortunately for me (but fortunately for you, since, hopefully, you'll be lugging it to the beach with you I hope I hope) it won't be that big when see it in the store.

When you see it, will you pick it up?

My publishing house, Simon & Schuster, is betting that you will. And since they're the horse that I"m riding in on, here's hoping they're right. They created a cover that implies people in a very public neighborhood setting, in close proximity–husbands, wives, lovers and other strangers–and yet they are aloof. As Woody Allen would say, "friendly, but not familiar."

And that's the crux of the story: does, as the adage goes, familiarity breed contempt? Does it kill passion?

Do we fall out of love when we reach the point that we know too much? If our partner's actions are mundane, are we boring, too, for putting up with it?

In this book, the divorce of a community's "perfect couple" sets off a rash of soul-searching for those who are on the outside looking in. These neighbors reason: if it can happen to them, how about me?

The only one who doesn't want to consider this is my heroine, Lyssa. She gets close enough to witness the destruction, and feels immune to the arrows of outrageous partners behaving badly–

Maybe because it hits too close to her own marriage.

Which brings me back to my cover. On the bench (which wraps around the whole book) are these four people. The middle two are in each others' arms, but what are they thinking about? Are the other two who share the bench with them strangers, or acquaintances?

The cover lends itself to the darker side of the story, although there is a lot of humor as well. (That's just the way I write.) Divorce is not murder or mass destruction, but it is still the death of trust and love; it is the destruction of a union that held hope.

What does it say to you? I'd love to hear your comments. 

At first I didn't like it. I wanted something softer. In time, though, I
grew to appreciate its edginess. And in person, the colors are rich,
which make it eye-popping as well. 

A note: for those of you who presume that authors get to choose their book covers, think again. Maybe if your first name is Dan, or your last name is Grisham you do, but for the rest of us, when it comes to a book contract, you may get "consideration" — in other words, they may take your opinion as to what you'd like to see on the cover — but the publisher has final say. His/Her decision takes into account the reaction from the sales team, which is out in the field pitching it to their accounts (who, by the way, swing a big stick, too, when it comes to covers).

From concept to cover,

—Josie

http://twitter.com/JosieBrownCA




Secret-Lives400w
 
Josie's
Next Book: Secret Lives of Husbands and Wives

Simon & Schuster/Downtown Press

(ISBN: 9781439173176)

In bookstores June 1, 2010. Order it
TODAY
!

"Hollywood's got nothing on the cast of characters living in
the
bedroom community of Paradise Heights, who have the secrets, sex, money
and scandal of an OK! Magazine cover story. Josie Brown is a skilled
observer whose clever dialogue and feisty style make for truly
entertaining reading."

Jackie
Collins
, bestselling author of Hollywood Wives and Poor Little Bitch Girl

In bookstores June 1, 2010. Pre-order
today
:

From Amazon

From Barnes & Noble

From Books a Million

From Borders

From Copperfield's

From Your
Local Independent Bookstore

From Powell's

From
Target

Red Hot Reads: Mug Shot

SecretMug When it comes to promoting their books, believe it or not authors will do anything short of standing on their heads. (Yeah, okay, some authors will do that, too. But not me. You've got to draw the line somewhere…)

Bookmarks are a given, as are business cards. This go-round, one of my "buy my book please, pretty please" giftees for booksellers is a mug emblazoned with the title of my next book, Secret Lives of Husbands and Wives, along with my name and the ISBN number. I figure that a mug is always appreciated because you can put it to good use: you know, fill it with you favorite tea and snuggle up with a good book (preferably mine…)

Well, my giveaway mugs came in a few days ago. I thought they looked great!

So did The Hub.

But The Son (obviously the spelling wiz in the family; now The Hub can quit boasting about his NYU sheepskin. GIVE IT A REST ALREADY!!!) picked up on the fact that, somehow, the mug makers forgot to cross the "t" on the word Secret.

Yowch!

You can see for yourself, stage right. Betcha didn't catch it at first, now didja?

Said mug makers are quickly making amends. As for the gross amount of mugs in my basement which bear the gross mistake . . .

Well, let me put it this way: Because the mug makers don't think they're worth shipping back, I'm now the proud owner of 144 mugs that proclaim SECREl LIVES OF HUSBANDS AND WIVES.

Merry Christmas, family and friends!

But despite my gi-normous Twitter and Facebook counts, I'd have to put the house in hock to send them out to ALL my BFFs. Note to all: You can pick yours up at a Josie book event near you.  I'll have some at every one of my signings until they're all gone.

My event calendar will be on my sidebar soon. When it is, look it over and meet me wherever I am, so that you'll get a bonus gift with your book!

When life gives you lemons, you make lemonade—

Then you serve it in a mug sporting a misspelled message,

—Josie

PS to Booksellers: Email me if you want a mug (coz, yeah, now I have PLENTY! First come/first serve on the mugs with the "t"!



BestSLHW Josie's Next Book: Secret Lives of Husbands and Wives

Simon & Schuster/Downtown Press

(ISBN: 9781439173176)

Look for it in bookstores June 1, 2010

From Amazon

From Barnes & Noble

From Bigger Books

From Books a Million

From Borders

From Boswell Books

From Copperfield's

From Your Local Independent Bookstore

From Powell's

Room Service by Richard Gere? Okay, Yeah, I’m In

RichardGere  Turns out Richard Gere and his lovely wife, Carrie Lowell, have turned their 18th Century farmhouse in the upstate New York town of Bedford into a B&B and yoga loft.You can read about it in the this link. which takes you to the article about it in W Magazine.

If he's doing room service delivery, I am so totally in. Particularly if he throws in breakfast in bed.

Oh yeah, and, um, a yoga pose: say, the utthita supta padangusthasana?

Talk about an über-DILF!

—Josie

Dilf Logo Small  

Josie’s Latest Radio Recap of THE BACHELORETTE, on Chat With Women

Edandjillian Okay, yeah, I know: morning voice.  Ain't it sexy? That's what happens when you NEED A NEW ALARM CLOCK.

Click here to listen to me recapping THE BACHELORETTE, Jillian's, choices (6/30/09) with Seattle KKNW's very own Chat with Women morning show hosts, Pam  and Rochelle. Every Tuesday morning at 8am PT, I give some insights on why she may be sticking it out with the allegedly two-timin' Wes (even though she is SO OBVIOUSLY attracted to Kiptyn…I'm just sayin'.)

Of course, I'm able to sneak in a few mentions of my book (coming out September 2009) THE COMPLETE IDIOT'S GUIDE TO FINDING MR. RIGHT.


Now, go vote on SingleMindedWomen.com's Weekly Bachelorette Elimination Poll. You can win WONDERFUL prizes: $100 of Sephora make-up, a beautiful sterling silver necklace by Big Girl Workshops, and of course, a copy of mine book

Don't we all wish we had 30 (or even 4) guys to luv us,

—Josie

CIG-Finding-Mr.-Right
Complete Idiot's Guide to Finding Mr. Right – In Bookstores September 2009

Tome of the Mommy: Mr. Mom, Welcome to the (Parent)Hood!

Visit msnbc.com for Breaking News, World News, and News about the Economy

The reason for their sudden appearances on our neighborhood parks may not be so wonderful—the result of this recession's layoffs—but happy dads (yeah, I'll say it, even a few DILFs or two) are always welcomed to share a shady spot and shoot the breeze with us moms.

It's interesting to watch the interaction: first a wariness, then a tentative welcome. Soon, everyone's sharing goldfish, carrot sticks and juice boxes.

Wish someone would slip in a Thermos of mojitos. I'm just sayin'…

Guys, don't ever presume the mommy clique on the picnic bench is a club in which no boys are allowed. In fact, the password that gets you in every time (along with a choice spot on the bench) is "Wow, your kid is so well-behaved…"

That's music to any mother's ears.

In The DILF –my book which comes out next summer –one man cracks the code, only to discover he's opened a Pandora's box filled with the misperceptions, fantasies and desires his female neighbors have about him and his now-disintegrated marriage. I'll have an excerpt up soon.

Seems that the timing couldn't be better for my book. As NBC's TODAY SHOW points out in the video piece above, there are enough dads out there now, that they're forming their own papa posses. (Wow! Did I just coin that phrase? Sure what the hey, I'll take credit for it…)

One very interesting comment is one dad's admission that sometimes the men talk about "our past lives before we had children."

Hmmmm. You mean, when the impulse to go out at night wasn't given a second thought ("Oh my god! Who can we get to sit with the baby?")

Or, you could sleep in and snuggle (or whatever) without be tapped on the shoulder by a toddler wanting to play?

Or when conversations revolved around work and sports and all things coupledom, as opposed to diaper-training and schools and all things parenthood?

Welcome to the club.
No, we really mean that. You came through initiation with flying colors.

Or, as one guy put it when the reporter asks if his Mr. Mom stint makes him a better dad: "It makes me a good-enough dad."

Reporter: "Hey, give yourself some credit!"

Dad, conceding: "It certainly makes me a better dad."

Your wife will agree.

 

—Josie

DilfBlue180  

Mr. Big as The DILF

504x_BAZAARMILLATWO As you know, I'm into DILFs in a big way these days (Blatant Self Promotion: My book, The DILF, hits bookstores Summer 2010). Obviously I've caught the zeitgeist (or, I guess, the economy has caught up with my plottin' and schemin'), because DILFs seem to be the new black.

Case in point: BAZAAR lives up to its name by downsizing SEX AND THE CITY's Mr. Big (Chris Noth) into a stay-at-home dad. He makes a cute DILF, doesn't he?

And needless to say, Milla Jovovich makes a stunning alpha wife. That straight fuchsia skirt is fetching, isn't it? Reminds me of my fave designer jacket of that same color, a wardrobe staple (worn with either a solid black or white skirt) when life required that I suit up.

Dems weren't the daze,

—Josie


PS: Thanks, Poppy, for the link…

Tome of the Mommy, #1: It’s official. SECRET LIVES OF HUSBANDS AND WIVES will be a book.

Kissing It's being published by Simon & Schuster. I'm thrilled, as you can imagine. Let's start with the fact that I'm enchanted with my editor, Megan McKeever. The excitement she and her team have for this project is an author's dream.

And just think: this time next year, it will be on a bookstore shelf near you.

What's the story? It is a chronicle of the bitter divorce of a "perfect
couple," and its impact on the gated community in which they live, is
seen through the eyes of a neighbor–Lyssa, a stay-at-home mom–who
doesn't realize the parallels between their marriage and her own. In
the process, she befriends the husband, Harry, a former Master of the
Universe turned stay-at-home dad–even as the neighborhood's mean mommies
vying to make him the next notch on their bedposts turn on her.

Just another fun day in suburbia, right?

6a00d83452b0d869e201156fbf8b42970c-800wi You know, writing a book is a lot like birthing a baby. The moment you
realize it's actually going to happen, you fall into a euphoric trance.

Sheer bliss.

And nothing can take that away from you…

Except the worry that perhaps something bad will befall it while it's
incubating. For an author, that can be anything from the "I'm not
worthy!" to "Will it find an audience?" to "What do I have to say
that is compelling enough to hold someone's attention for 300+ pages?" 

When this happens, those deep breathing exercises we learn in Lamaze classes certainly come in handy.

Well, I'm happy to report that I'm feeling no qualms whatsoever. (Liar, Liar, pants on fire..)

No,
seriously, I mean that. I've been through the birthing experience, four
times: two that were the human kind (Austin and Anna), and another two
that were the novel kind (and Impossibly Tongue-Tied and True Hollywood Lies).

During that first trimester, reality sets in. There is
so much preparation before the blessed event: outlining a compelling
plot; creating characters that are real–to you, and hopefully future
readers; making sure the dialogue coming out of their mouths is
something someone would actually say–and that others would respond to.

Is it any wonder you feel nauseous?

By the middle trimester, you're in your groove: pages are flowing, you're heavy with chapter, edits are coming back, but nothing that you feel throws the plot baby out with the bath water. (Some analogy, huh?) In fact, you fall into a complacent routine where everything seems hunky-dory…

But by it's delivery date – in The DILF's case, June 2010 – you are more than ready to share you bundle of joy with the rest of the world.

Will this book be The Second Coming? I would never presume as much. (Besides, in the book universe, Harry Potter has already claimed that title.) Wise parents know that the most they can hope for their offspring is a long and fruitful life.

And of course, you envision a success future. (Those of us who had reserved our children's places in their preschools even before they were born know what I mean).

So that my new baby lives a long and healthy life, I'm going to go on the theory that it takes a village to birth a book. I'll include you on how it's going: all the birthing pains, all those little kicks of joy, all the hopes and schemes and dreams I have for it, to make it a book you'll want to read.

Along the way, I'll ask your opinion, let you in on some secrets (plot-wise, and about the writer's process), and invite you to the celebration of this blessed birth. And great news! When time comes for my new baby's shower, the gifts will be for you

So stay tuned!

—Josie

www.josiebrown.com